jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
My GNOME Outreach Program for Women internship is now over. My project was the JavaScript app developer documentation. When I started, it was woefully out-of-date and incomplete, and extremely poorly organized.

So how is it now?

Still really bad, in my opinion. Especially compared to Apple or Android's developer docs.

You can see, on the page I was working on, the beginnings of a curriculum. It tells you what you need to do to get started, and then starts to walk you through GNOME app development before giving you lots of code samples for specific widgets. But there are some experiments and approaches I took that I think were questionable, like the Switch widget example that covered AboutDialogs in more detail than Switches, or the starting lesson which jumps straight into Webkit.

When I started this project, I knew things had to be better but I didn't fully know how to get there. I used a lot of trial and error, writing code sample after code sample and refining my approach in each one. After attending the Open Help conference and sprint, I had a much clearer idea of where to go, and you can see the outline for my "App Guide" project on the live.gnome.org wiki.

I hope to complete the first draft of this guide in time for the next round of Outreach Program interns, and I hope to become a mentor for some of them. Whether they're working to improve developer docs, or writing their own GNOME apps.

Taryn's take on the Outreach Program

It was one of the best experiences of my life. It was confusing and frustrating at first, especially once I found out that GNOME app development wasn't as simple as I'd been led to believe by the existing tutorials. But I found my footing quickly, I think, even if that involved asking a ton of questions on IRC.

The parts that I'll always remember include all the technical triumphs, the encouragement from my mentor and the other interns and people involved in the program, and meeting up with people at Open Help. And in the #gnome-women IRC meeting where we gave feedback on the program, I said that one of the best things about it was how open-ended it was, because of how it let me understand the problem and approach it in my own way.

Since then, though, I realized another big thing about the program that helps make it successful:

Money

We've probably all seen the research on what motivates us, and how money is not a big part of it. But you know who's really motivated by money? People who don't have enough.

Women, disabled people, gender and sexual / romantic minorities, ethnic and cultural minorities ... all these groups are more likely to have a hard time making ends meet financially. And the opportunity cost for them to volunteer for Free Software is a lot greater than it is for a white, abled, male, non-queer hacker, who's being paid a decent salary and has health insurance.

Just as an example, the time I spent dealing with autistic shutdown and widespread intolerance, and trying to explain feminism 101 concepts to deter trolls from attacking me and others, are all things that most hackers don't have to deal with. They're practically a second job for many ... to say nothing of the women who are still expected to be the primary (or sole) caretakers for their children.

The Outreach Program's $5,000 payment is barely enough to maintain a minimal first-world standard of living over three months. But for me, it was more than enough. I was finally living my dreams, and being paid to work on what most excited me. And I could set aside other work that I didn't have the spoons (emotional energy) for, so that I could concentrate on this.

One of the reasons I'm going to continue working on GNOME is because I'm hoping to sell the App Developer's Guide as a Creative Commons-licensed book, and make some money from it. I'm hoping that once "GNOME OS" becomes more widespread, more people will want to learn to write apps for it, and that this guide will be there for them.

But another huge reason is because, once the problem of "how do I pay rent and buy food?" was taken care of for a few months, I saw how much I loved being a part of the GNOME community and helping with my part of it. So that stipend provided the activation energy for what will hopefully become a chain reaction, as I mentor other women who may go on to help others in turn.

I'm hoping to show them that they can be a part of GNOME too; that GNOME needs them, and that they can have fun contributing to GNOME. And while it may seem vulgar to talk about if you're explaining the program to people who don't need the money, as someone who's been there that stipend really helps sell the program to people who do.

Wrapping things up

Many thanks to the GNOME Foundation, Google, Mozilla, Collabora, the Free Software Foundation, and Red Hat for sponsoring my internship. I had a lot of fun with it, and I hope I made (or am) something that's worth it.

Many thanks to my mentor, Tiffany Antopolski, for answering so many weird questions and doing so much work to find out how to make the JavaScript code work right, especially for her version of the "Hello, GNOME" tutorial which hasn't gone live yet. Seriously, she went the extra kilometre, especially since mentors aren't paid.

Many thanks to her, Radina Matic, and Marta Maria Casetti, for being extremely supportive either on my journal or in person at Open Help. I needed a lot of encouragement and reassurance, and it was an amazing feeling to be validated and accepted there. If I'd known this would happen, I would've tried to raise money to go to GUADEC too somehow.

Many thanks to Shaun McCance for running the Open Help conference, and to him and Ryan Lortie for answering my questions there and helping me figure out what the App Guide should cover. Also just for being awesome. You guys rock.

Finally, many thanks to Marina Zhurakhinskaya and Karen Sandler for running the Outreach Program, and to Karen for helping make it possible as the GNOME Foundation's Executive Director. This may be the most welcoming Free Software community for women (including trans women) that I know of, right up there with Dreamwidth.

Here's hoping, and helping, that it just gets better from here.
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
In my last entry, I asked a few questions about the New GNOME User experience:
  1. A novice programmer learns to write GNOME apps. What does she do? Where does she go? When does she give up in frustration?

  2. A GNOME user notices an error in the documentation, or a bug in an application she uses. How does she correct it? How does she find out how to correct it? How far out of her way does she have to go to correct it once she finds out?

  3. A GNOME enthusiast wants to ask a question, or share something she's learned with her friends. Where does the conversation happen? What medium does it use? Whose needs was that medium designed to meet, when?
Let's look at a hypothetical scenario for that first question, to get an idea of the kinds of challenges new application developers face.

Goal: Learn to write apps

This hypothetical person knows what an app is, that people called "developers" write them, and that she can use her distro's package manager to get them. She may have dabbled in HTML, but she doesn't know how to program beyond that. It's only now that she's decided she wants to learn, because she wants to write an app for her favourite platform. She's not interested in "contributing to GNOME" beyond that ... yet.

  1. Start on gnome.org. Oh, hey, there's an "Applications" option right there. Let's click on it.

  2. It's talking about "the great applications that you can use on GNOME", but doesn't say how to make them. Maybe "Get Involved" says something about it?

  3. That talked about "contributing code," which sounds sort of like writing an app. It linked me to the GNOME Love page, but this is talking about mailing lists and patches and IRC and stuff. It says there are a few tutorials, but they're all years out of date. Oh wait, it says something about a "GNOME Developer Center". Is that what I want?

  4. It has a carousel of shiny "10-minute tutorials," which looks reassuring. The text underneath says I need to download developer tools to get started. But the page for that stumped me. I got the Software Centre to install Anjuta, DevHelp, and Glade like it said, but which is my "favourite programming language"? How do I know? Who's going to tell me which one is best or where I can learn it at?


If our newb is especially perspicacious, she may just pick one at random and go from there. Or she may do like I tend to do and spend hours reading comparisons between each language. Either way, she's hit a speed bump, if not a brick wall, and it took her awhile to figure out how to get here.

If she does click on one of the 10-minute tutorials? This is what she'll see, no matter which one she picks. Even if the carousel worked, the tutorials aren't sorted by programming language. She might've settled on Python, only to find herself faced with C.

Questions:
  1. Why doesn't the Applications page have a link to our Developer Centre? Outside of the one in the footer. Do we assume that nobody visiting gnome.org wants to learn to write GNOME applications, or that everyone who wants to already knows how?

  2. Why do we assume that newbs already have a "favourite programming language?" Are we wishy-washy about recommending one to beginners, or do we assume that there are no beginners consulting our Developer Centre?

  3. Why do our tutorials suggest installing Anjuta and Glade when they simply don't work with the latest GNOME technologies? JavaScript can't be debugged in Anjuta, and Glade doesn't support ApplicationWindows, IIRC.


I feel we could do a lot better here, and I'm open to suggestions for what I can do. Personally, I feel that the biggest change we can make beyond modernizing our tutorials would be a direct link to our Developer Centre from the Applications page. Even if someone didn't go there wanting to learn to write apps, we can put the thought in her head that "Yes, you can do this if you want to," and she'll be more likely to take a closer look.

Feel free to discuss in the comments! If you don't have an OpenID to leave a comment with, I can be reached @jewelfox on identi.ca.
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
This is in response to Benjamin Otte's post, which I thought was extremely insightful. It both voiced some concerns that I have, and validated them. I recommend reading the comments as well, as there are a lot of interesting perspectives there.

What is GNOME, and what is its future?
In fact, these days GNOME describes itself as a “community that makes great software”, which is as nondescript as you can get for software development.
Agreed.

I was trying to think how I would describe GNOME to anyone. How do I explain to a non-technical user what a "desktop environment" is? I've been telling most people I'm "working on Linux," even though I love the GNOME project and want it to succeed. I'm just not completely sure what it's supposed to be succeeding at.

I found that commenter Richard Brown summed up my feelings about GNOME, however, when he said
GNOME 3 is a fine choice for a developer/techie who wants a clean, clear UI with minimal distractions (a role I personally think it excels in)
And this is why I choose GNOME over Unity, or any other "desktop environment." I like things that are simple and clean. I like having few distractions or annoyances. I love GNOME 3's direction, and I fully support it and want to help people make awesome GNOME apps that take advantage of its new features.

Which is why I take things like romu's comment as personal failures:
I’m looking at how I can develop Gnome apps. My preference comes to Javascript because if I don’t really love its too free syntax, it seems an ubiquitous language.

I’ve read all tutorials on the Gnome Develop web site. And know, I’m at the point where I don’t even know how to write the code to just create a simple text file. So I’m trying to digg into the Gnome source code to get some examples, but honestly, I’m getting close to give up. Unfortunately searching the web doesn’t work as there is too few very simple tutorials for Gnome which covers a wide range of use cases.

Another comment from a developer point of view, is the lack of a good development environment. I’m not a big fan of M$, but just consider how you can make a simple working “hello world” windows app with 3 mouse clicks ! Making possible to write apps in Js with GJS is a step forward to ease the Gnome dev, but Anjuta doesn’t support Js debbuging (I failed trying to make it work), and Gedit, even if simple and stable, lacks some modern IDE features.
Those are the docs that I'm trying to work on. They're still not complete. We're at the halfway point now, and a lot of the code samples are documented, but there's still a ton of work to get done and until it's finished, people like him are going to be left out.

But while I feel personally responsible for this, I also feel that the GNOME community at large does not place outreach as a high priority, awesome internship programs notwithstanding. And I feel that this is largely because we don't understand -- or value -- other people's perspectives.

Some people, like romu, still make fun of "Micro$oft." But there was an article in Vanity Fair about "How Microsoft Lost Its Mojo" that we may ought to pay attention to:
Sometimes, though, the problems from bureaucracy came down to a simple reality: The young hotshots from the 1980s, techies who had joined the company in their 20s and 30s, had become middle-aged managers in their 40s and 50s. And, some younger engineers said, a good number of the bosses just didn’t understand the burgeoning class of computer users who had been children—or hadn’t even been born—when Microsoft opened its doors. When younger employees tried to point out emerging trends among their friends, supervisors sometimes just waved them away.
Here in GNOME, I feel our division isn't between old and young. I feel that it's between established desktop Free Software users, and people who have grown up in an entirely different computing world but want to contribute to (and use) Free Software. And when they try to do so, there's an enormous culture shock, because the desktop Free Software world right now is set up to meet the needs of a very specific audience -- and, in many cases, only that specific audience.

Earlier on Identi.ca, I lamented the lack of a decent Free Software notetaking app that would sync between all my devices. In response, one of my friends suggested using emacs and orgmode, and waxed enthusiastic about how "Since it's plaintext, [it's] easy to sync between laptops via git!" In short order, he revealed a number of assumptions that I feel are common in the Free Software community:
  • "Syncing" is something that happens between laptops, not between desktop and tablet computers and smartphones.
  • Recommending the use of emacs and git to solve a particular problem is a reasonable solution.
  • Recommending the use of emacs and git to solve a problem that most people would use a dedicated, well-maintained, thoughtfully-designed application for is also a reasonable solution.
I feel that the vast majority of potential contributors are discouraged from participating by assumptions like these. Which insist on a high degree of technical knowledge and a high tolerance for frustration in order to contribute to or enjoy Free Software ... on the desktop. Which is one reason why the hackers and idealists inside much larger and healthier Free Software communities, like Mozilla's and WordPress', largely use Macs.

Likewise, romu was looking for a modern IDE and developer tutorials -- prerequisites for almost any new developer. But there simply aren't any. There haven't been for years. Anjuta hasn't kept up with the times, because "everyone" using console mode text editors. And the tutorials haven't kept up, because "everyone" knows how to program already and is comfortable looking at source for "documentation". Is the impression I get.

Is there hope for us?

The reason I like GNOME 3 so much is because it's a radical, modern redesign, that takes into account the best practices that have been learned and demonstrated by Other Popular Computing Platforms (without aping them shamelessly). It's clean. It's simple. It's beautiful. It's something to get excited about.

But I feel that as long as we're making the desktop more accessible -- to the impaired, to people from different cultures, and to people with low tolerance for frustration -- we should also make the community itself more accessible to such people. If anything, I feel that this should be a higher priority for us, especially after we've lost so many who were displeased with GNOME 3's direction.

We should be asking ourselves things like
  • A novice programmer learns to write GNOME apps. What does she do? Where does she go? When does she give up in frustration?
  • A GNOME user notices an error in the documentation, or a bug in an application she uses. How does she correct it? How does she find out how to correct it? How far out of her way does she have to go to correct it once she finds out?
  • A GNOME enthusiast wants to ask a question, or share something she's learned with her friends. Where does the conversation happen? What medium does it use? Whose needs was that medium designed to meet, when?
Because as someone who's just getting started in the GNOME community, even after years of using it on my personal desktop, it takes a lot of frustration and dedication to learn how to use mailing lists, IRC, git, Bugzilla, and other such things. Everyone seems to assume I know something I don't, and everything from the plaintext interfaces to error messages like "Zarro boogs found" sends me the message that I don't belong here. Or that I only do if I'm willing to put up with frustrations and cultural assumptions that I wouldn't have to, if I wanted to channel my passions in a different direction, or even into a different (web-based) Free Software project.

I'm working to change this, because I believe in GNOME. I'm trying to improve the JavaScript docs for the next romu. What can you do? Who's being left out, and how can we help them?
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
What I proposed creating in that last entry is basically a prototype of the fursona creator. The one I make will be written in the same language, but will be for the web instead of GNOME, so anyone reading this should be able to use it.

My internship with GNOME has been a lot of help in boosting my confidence in my programming skills. I'm excited about finally making these things happen.

In other news, I recently started playing Final Fantasy XI Online again, after trying out their 14-day demo and then buying the full game for like $12. And a controller so I can play it the way that it's meant to be played. >.>; [personal profile] rev_yurodivy, [personal profile] aliaspseudonym and I have been having fun running around Lakshmi server, and anyone who wants to is welcome to join in.
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
GNOME's developer website is shiny and ambitious. There are a variety of "10-minute tutorials" available for each programming language which GNOME supports, which let you do fun activities like create a guitar tuner or messageboard. And a "Beginner's tutorials" section for each language contains useful code samples, which show how to implement many Gtk widgets.

There are a few problems with the existing docs, though.
  1. They're out-of-date. Many, if not all, of the existing 10-minute tutorials for JavaScript are in need of editing. The guitar tuner one even has a terminal command randomly sandwiched inside the text (yelp-check validate *page). More than that, the code is outdated because of how GNOME JavaScript development has advanced in the last couple of years.

  2. They're incomplete. Each 10-minute tutorial does a good job of explaining the basics of one aspect of GNOME development, like using Gstreamer for audio or Libsoup to pull things from the web. But none of them answers the question "Where do I go from here?"

  3. They're disorganized. Shaun McCance explained to me on IRC that the current developer page was a project at a 2010 hackfest, which never got completed. So the pictures of each tutorial don't link to the actual tutorials, and there's no clear starting point.
Tiffany Antopolski has some plans for redesigning the site at this year's OpenHelp hackfest, which I will hopefully be helping with. That should take care of the "disorganized" part. In the meantime, here's my idea for how to fix those first two points:

A complete modern JavaScript tutorial

It will have a clear beginning point, which will assume only that you know the basics of JavaScript programming and using GNOME. From there, it will teach you how to get started with writing for GNOME, and will show you how to build a complete, functional application, step by step.
Sample application: "Persona Creator"

This application lets you create, collect, and organize people's "Personas," or personal profiles. If you've ever played pen-and-paper roleplaying games, think of your profile as like a character sheet for your involvement with GNOME, or with free culture and software in general.

You'll have an avatar icon, a "class" that shows how you contribute, and "attributes" that explain things like what applications or programming languages you use the most. A personal quote and bio will let you tell the world what you're up to, and built-in sharing features will let you send your profile to your instant messaging contacts, publish it to your blog or journal, or create a messageboard signature based on it.

Ideally, this would tie in to the Contacts application somehow. It's not necessary, though, and either way it'll be a fun project that will show people how they can express themselves using code.
Here's a tentative lesson plan:
  1. Hello, GNOME! Explains how we're going to build GNOME applications with JavaScript, and shows you how to get Gedit and Terminal set up for coding.

  2. Your First GNOME Application: Explains the basic boilerplate code that you'll use for each application, and walks you through creating an ApplicationWindow containing a Webkit view with a JavaScript web app inside. This is so people who are used to web programming can have an immediate starting point.

  3. Going Native: A multipart chapter that shows the basics of how to use native GNOME widgets and concepts, including:

    • The application menu

    • Modal dialogs, including MessageDialog and the AboutDialog

    • Buttons, Labels, and other basic UI elements

    • Toolbars with tooltips

    • The TreeView widget and underlying ListStore

  4. Keeping Things Organized: How to use Libgda to store our profiles in an SQLite database.

  5. GNOME Live, Starring You: How to use Gstreamer to capture input from the webcam and microphone, as well as to play back sounds.

  6. Sharing Is Caring: How to use Telepathy to send our profiles to instant messaging contacts (as well as receive theirs), and Libsoup to publish them online.

  7. Making It Shiny: The basics of Clutter animations.

  8. Packing It Up: How to use autotools and create a complete application, along with links to guides that explain the basics of packaging for various distros.

  9. BONUS: How to Write GNOME Shell Extensions: The other thing you can do with JavaScript!

  10. BONUS: Git-ting Involved With GNOME: A very basic overview of sharing your code online and checking out others', with links to more detailed tutorials.
As an appendix, the tutorials would contain the detailed code samples that Tiffany and I have already been working on. Another possible "bonus" tutorial would explain how to use Glade to visually design the UI, with a quick discussion of the pros and cons of doing so.

These new tutorials will be added to the "Beginner's tutorials and samples" page with the code samples, for now, and at OpenHelp we can decide how exactly everything ought to be arranged. I may need to help with modernizing the 10-minute tutorials some, which would also help me to understand the libraries used in them.

Anyway, I'm open to any suggestions, concerns, or offers to help!
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
For those of you reading on Planet GNOME, I'm Taryn, one of the interns brought in as part of the 2012 Outreach Program for Women. And I'm in ur dev site writing ur JavaScript docs. The kind that are made for absolute newbs like me, as opposed to the detailed stuff which either assumes that you're using C or assumes that you already know what you're doing.
In the 80s, most computer users had practically no, or only basic, training on operating systems and applications software. However, software design practices continued to implicitly assume knowledgeable and competent users, who would be familiar with technical vocabularies and system architectures, and also possess an aptitude for solving problems arising from computer usage.

Such implicit assumptions rapidly became unacceptable.

-- Mads Soegarrd, The History of Usability, emphasis added
Now, I mostly do writing for a living. I've only done programming off and on, for personal projects or websites. And when I signed up for this internship, this is what it looked like to write a GNOME application in JavaScript:
#!/usr/bin/gjs

// Initialize GTK+
var Gtk = imports.gi.Gtk;
Gtk.init(null, 0);

// Create window and give it a name
var sampleWindow = new Gtk.Window({type: Gtk.WindowType.TOPLEVEL});
sampleWindow.title = "Welcome to GNOME";

// Connect clicking the X button to the window's destroy signal
sampleWindow.connect("destroy", function(){Gtk.main_quit()});

// Show the window
sampleWindow.show();

// Start up the application
Gtk.main();
I saw this, and my mind was blown. It was just like the books I had when I was little, where you type in the programming code on your Commodore 64 and write your own computer games. I could write my own GNOME apps, using what may be the world's simplest "real" programming language! Then I could explain what I learned to others, and pretty soon the world's awesomest free desktop could take advantage of things like Mozilla's Webmaker initiative, where they're going to teach people how to code ... in languages like JavaScript.

As I quickly found out, though, this is what a GNOME application is actually supposed to look like.

Fortunately, I have by now mostly finished panicking, and I actually understand what's going on in that and several other code samples. My amazing mentor and I are gradually figuring out what JavaScript code does what, even though there's basically no beginner-oriented developer documentation for it ... which, again, is where I come in. Theoretically, I should be better-prepared to explain this stuff to newbs since I am one myself.

Hopefully, by the end of this summer I won't be one anymore. And hopefully, those 14-year-olds learning how to write for the web will be empowered to write their own GNOME applications as well.
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
Here's a summary of what I've learned about how to write GNOME developer documentation. I'm going to be referencing this a lot during the Outreach Program for Women internship, so I wanted to have it all in one place, preferably public so that others can read or critique it.

Update: This page contains a much better reference, and I am working on adding any unique content here to it and the rest of the GNOME wiki.

Many thanks to Tiffany Antopolski, aka mimico on the IRC, as well as the others on IRC for helping!

  1. Git-ting started

  2. How to write code samples (as listed here)

  3. Taking screenshots and showing your work

  4. Resources and links


Read more... )
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
The last week or so has not been very good, thanks to illness, stress, and depression caused by both. On top of that, the Major News Site I write for is becoming impatient with me after a month of very poor performance, and is starting to lecture me about how to write for them and request fewer articles from me.

About work

I was beginning to think that I may have to write them off for good, even after the Of The Year award and some amazing performance before April. Which would have meant financial disaster for me, if not for the internship. But after spending the last couple days taking a break from things and playing Minecraft, I came back to it feeling refreshed, and wrote an article that I'm proud of about a subject that's important to me.

I'd been feeling like I didn't want to have anything to do with social justice issues; I didn't feel like I had the strength to address them. But I'm proud of how I handled it today, and I feel like maybe part of the problem is that they could tell I was losing my passion for things and burning out.

Between the internship and the financial support I've received / am receiving from some wonderful people (should I name names?), I think I can afford to not write to a quota anymore and only write things when I feel strongly about them ... which will probably improve my pageviews and make my editors happy with me anyway. I just didn't think I could afford to take that risk before.

Thank you, to everyone who's assisted us in the last few months. It means a lot to us and [personal profile] rev_yurodivy.

About the RPG

I've started work on a website that should help and be easy to use. It may take a little while, and I'm sorry if anyone's lost interest already. I haven't been able to keep on top of things as I'd like to, and I underestimated just how much work -- and how much interest -- there would be.

I'm going to continue working on this even if others' interest drops off, just because it's something I want to see happen. I'll show it to everyone once it's in a usable format.

Update on the internship

It starts later this month, and I'm trying to get the website done first (before I have to spend more of my day writing JavaScript documentation). I'm continuing to lurk on the GNOME IRC, though, which will basically be my workplace, and I'm keeping in touch with my mentor ... helping give input on things, and taking copious notes.

I'm still really excited about this project. I just wish I already knew what I could do afterwards, that could still be tech-related and could lead to a paying thing. I really want to have something to do for work besides writing, so that I can take a break from one or the other when needed to keep from burning out. Which is one thing I've learned that I need in the past couple weeks.
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
Dun dun dun DUN!

If you're reading this coming from there, hello and I hope I don't weird you out too much. ~.^

Everyone else, this is awesome for so many reasons. Now I just need to get Fedora 17 set up so that I can rewrite the existing JavaScript tutorials to use the new ApplicationWindow class. The current state of the docs is really bad and scattered, and there's no clear path for a JavaScript developer -- in other words, a person who knows the most basic and common language of the web -- to learn how to write apps for GNOME. Hopefully, by the time that this summer is over, I'll have helped change that.

Wish me luck!
jewelfox: A portrait of a female anthropomorphic fox, with a pink jewelled pendant and a cute overbite. (Default)
You can read it here, same place as always. It desperately needs formatting, but then, I still need to learn better HTML.

I haven't replied to comments much partly because of needing to recover from last weekend, and partly because of applying for the GNOME Women's Outreach internship. They need a comprehensive tutorial for how to write JavaScript apps for the GNOME desktop, and I hope to be able to provide them with one. In the process, I'll be learning JavaScript, which will help with web programming as well.

Will still try to get back to you all. >.>b Thanks for all your support. Wish me luck on getting accepted to the internship. And yes, it's open to anyone who identifies as a woman.

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~ Fox | Gem | Rei ~

We tell stories, paint minis, collect identity words, and share them all with our readers. If something we write helps you, let us know.

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