jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

I've been kind of uncomfortable with Pathfinder and D&D both for different reasons, and started looking for another role-playing game that has the rules for free online and lets you write your own stuff for it.

So far I've found two that look promising: Dungeon World and 13th Age. You can find their respective SRDs, or free online rules documents, here and here.

Both are strongly inspired by Pathfinder and D&D, with stock fantasy adventuring tropes and more or less stock fantasy character options. But the authors went in two different directions with them ... especially with regard to how accessible their games are to newbies. Whether those newbs are players, or fan / professional authors.

Read more... )

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

When I was around six to eight years old, my mother of origin told me there were two ways a woman could get pregnant. The usual way, that I knew a few of the terms for from reading children's books about them, and when God just gives her a child.

I decided that when it came time to start a family of my own, I would opt for the second way.

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

Mythic is a roleplaying game, or a game about taking on the role of a character. The character you play as in Mythic is a creature of legend, from Chinese dragons to Biblical seraphim. You can choose pretty much any kind to play as, and you can make your character's abilities true to the real-world lore or base them on movie or video game characters.

In order to use your mythical powers, you need to draw on sources of Faith, which can be anything that affirms or is part of your Mythos -- a set of beliefs about how the world works, which all of your powers are based on. A fey creature might commune with a sacred forest, for instance, while a guardian angel draws strength from the prayers of a child. Meanwhile, a woman with "fake" fox ears and a tail might carry a mysterious jewel at all times.

The one thing that all Mythic characters have in common is that they appear to be fully human (or object, or animal). Some of them actually are human, at least some of the time. But whatever you normally look like, through an act of will you can Manifest your true Nature for a short time, inspiring awe and leaving no doubt as to what you actually are ... at least, to anyone familiar with the stories that make up your mythos. It's up to you what this looks and sounds like, from the infernal heat and damned wailing that heralds a demon's ascent to the shredded clothes and ear-splitting howl of a werewolf's transformation.

While your nature is manifest, you can use your powers without spending faith, and you can draw on an additional reservoir of power to do things no ordinary person can. But the more you draw on it, the worse the consequences are for you and the people around you. You may become a "corrupted" version of yourself, accidentally kill or injure a person you care about, or even break the foundations of reality.

Read more... )

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

A black-and-white, stick figure-y comic from Cardboard Crack. The Magic: the Gathering player on the left side of the table asks the one on the other side 'Did you see that the character Alesha was revealed to be transgender?' The other says 'Yeah, I can't stand it! Why can't I just enjoy a fantasy storyline without some political statement?!' The first replies 'People aren't transgender to make a political statement.'
Comic used without permission.

Before I came out as trans, I wrote stories about “becoming your fursona,” or a furry-fied version of your “true self,” which were meant to encourage people who were hurting because who they were was not accepted by the people around them.

When I started writing these stories, I was still Mormon. And as someone who’d just entered the furry community, I was getting to know a lot of LGBT individuals, who honestly didn’t seem any different from the people around them despite what I’d been told. This put me in a quandary: How do I encourage people to be their “true selves" if their “true self” is someone the prophets have said is a pervert? [CN: Homophobia]

I had to choose one or the other.

Some of them, mostly orcs, boasted of their ancestors’ deeds and spoke of their pride in adopting those ancestors’ names. She had been so different—only sixteen, a boy in everyone’s eyes but her own, about to choose and declare her name before the khan and all the Mardu.

The khan had walked among the warriors, hearing the tales of their glorious deeds. One by one, they declared their new war names, and each time, the khan shouted the names for all to hear. Each time, the horde shouted the name as one, shaking the earth.

Then the khan came to Alesha. She stood before him, snakes coiling in the pit of her stomach, and told how she had slain her first dragon. The khan nodded and asked her name.

“Alesha,” she said, as loudly as she could. Just Alesha, her grandmother’s name.

“Alesha!” the khan shouted, without a moment’s pause.

And the whole gathered horde shouted “Alesha!” in reply. The warriors of the Mardu shouted her name.

-- The Truth of Names [CN: Violence]

There are those who would say that I made the wrong choice. But the only reason I had to choose to begin with, the only reason trans people’s existence in person or in stories is a political issue, is because the people who say that are terrible people.

And they are afraid that the people around them are not what they look like.

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

Here’s what we’ve gotten trimmed and assembled so far, for our budding Tau Empire battlegroup:

Nearly two dozen small, infantry-sized miniatures on display. Each one has a base the size of a coin.

That’s about 300 points worth of models,* in two squads of six Fire Warriors each, ten gun drones (which we can use as their own squad or attach to regular units), and one Ethereal, which our mom [personal profile] burning_ground sent to us. Apparently she assembled and painted a lot of Tau and Kroot models herself, back in the day, but never got a chance to use them!

(You should see her Shadow-Samus conversion. Pics will be forthcoming eventually.)

These Fire Warriors were kind of an epic undertaking, as you can see from the instruction sheet beneath this one.

A closeup of one of the Fire Warrior models from the first photograph. It is crouching on top of a sheet of paper with instructions for building one on it. The instructions list about eight pieces for each model.

When we got a box of House Shyeel Battle Mages for our Ret list in Warmachine, we got half a dozen metal models which were fully- or almost fully-assembled. Here, we got like a half-dozen “sprues,” which are the frameworks the raw plastic parts are still attached to. It took us weeks just to clip off the pieces we wanted to use, trim the mould lines off of those, and then glue all the pieces together.

Our next project is going to be a Devilfish, which is like a combination hovertank and ground transport and is about the size of one of those squads of six soldiers. It’s so neat -- the hatch in back opens and closes and there are benches inside, and you can attach two gun drones to its wings or detach them as needed. We’re excited to work on it!

We also have yet another secret project coming up after that, involving some winged Warmachine models that mom bought to get into that game …



* A typical game of Warhammer 40,000 is played at around 1500 points. I am not going to be playing a typical game anytime soon.

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

Is anyone else having this problem? Does anyone know how to fix it?

Edit: N/M, for some reason my email subscriptions got turned off even though I haven't been anywhere near that page in awhile. -_-; Time to go through my inbox ...

Edit 2: N/M the N/M, I misread the settings page. >_< I guess that I'm just not getting DW emails. Maybe I can link my DW account to a different email provider ... or just check my inbox more often.

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

So, I spent much of today reading comments and forum posts by Warhammer 40,000 players, for some reason. (This doesn't only apply to them, though; it has a lot to do with Pathfinder and video games as well.)

40k players spend an awful lot of time complaining online, it feels like. But what's interesting to me is what they choose to complain about. Roughly half of the forum-goers I saw were complaining about the company that makes the Warhammer models; how Games Workshop's latest rulebook ruined their fun, invalidated their strategies, and obsoleted their favourite models.

Some of their stories are really sad. "40K" players invest dozens or hundreds of hours in their cherished pastime, sometimes in just a single model, and it shows. Far from looking for an excuse to complain, the most upset players seemed more like betrayed lovers, who had given and given and given and were rewarded with Games Workshop's scorn.

The other half ... were complaining about the first half.

Read more... )

I don't know where I'm going with this. It's late, and I'm tired and rambly.

I just feel like, the less inequality there is between players and game publishers -- and between the players and each other -- the less fighting and arguing there seems to be, and the more creative freedom there is.

I like the Tau model collection I'm building, but I feel more at home with game players and companies which treat me with respect.

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

We just came back from a one-off game of the Firefly RPG, that [personal profile] rev_yurodivy really wanted to go to, where we played the crew of the Serenity.

(We were River and Yuro was Simon, in case you were curious.)

Not particularly NSFW, just silly )

If you have any questions, ask Yuro, because they were more awake than we were (and we only watched the movie besides).

jewelfox: A portrait of a foxgryphon with a beak, black fur, magenta hair, fox ears, and a neckband with a large jewel on it. (Default)

The guy what made Minecraft bought a $70 million mansion in Beverly Hills.

I get that Minecraft has been a lot of fun and helped a lot of people and been a tool and a canvas for self-expression. But as Firefly / Serenity fans know, being awesome doesn't necessarily lead to becoming popular. And as anyone knows who's been inspired by an underpaid teacher, having a profound, positive impact on the lives of numerous people doesn't earn you six (or eight) figures. It might not even pay the bills.

I'm not saying Minecraft doesn't deserve to be popular. But I am saying that if it's worth $70 million USD for what it does, then there are a whole lot of people and creative works that we're undervaluing here. Starting with all the unpaid fanwork that made Minecraft a household name to begin with.

I also think it's obscene that any one person is allowed to have that much money and use it all to buy a house, when even one other person is involuntarily homeless in the same country as the house that he bought.

I'm going to see the pictures of that housewarming party in my head now, every time I see Minecraft merchandise in stores.

About us

Furry, fantasy, and fanfiction writer. Miniatures hobbyist, Mi'qote White Mage, 4E DM. Windows gamer, fangirl, and developer. Pronouns she/her, they/their.

Transfemale plurality, otherkin, fictive. Polyamorous pansexual. Proud introvert. Inari worshiper; xenotheist.

We wrote Jewelfox's Otherkin FAQ.

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